Tools and Jigs

Too Many Planes

Following on from my last post I’m adding some more photos directly from Google photos. I am still adding more planes to my  wall. I have far too many handplanes but sadly I like them. Recently, well actually today I have been reorganising my tool wall to make room for more planes. Still have a couple to go …..

 

Stanley Bailey and Record Planes

I bought these three planes from an online site the sale included three planes at $30 so that’s $10 each. I really wanted the No 7 so the two No4 planes  were a bonus.  The No4 planes are a Stanley /Bailey made  in Australia and an English made Record. All are rusty and dirty but otherwise seem to be in basically good condition. The No4 Stanley has a crack in the tote or handle. The No7 has a plastic tote but the forward handle is timber so I will make another. I have bought these to use rather restore and stick them in a cupboard.

 

I found some websites that were helpful and interesting Hans Brunner Tools has lots of information about the Bailey / Stanley handplanes. I also came across a site dedicated to Record Hand Tools which is full of useful information about theses tools. Additionally there is this video from Jay Bates  shows how he tackles a hand plane restoration.  Finally if you want to make your own tote there is a template available from Lee Valley tools  which includes  a diagram and instructions.

 

An Organiser for Sandpaper

This was my last woodworking project for 2016 completed on New Years eve a storage box for sheets of sandpaper. It only took about 2 hours from start to finish. It all made from offcuts left over from recently completed projects.  The carcass is constructed from 12mm construction grade plywood and the shelves are made from 3mm mdf. I used the sheet size of the sandpaper to lay out the internal dimensions an added about 10mm width to accommodate placement in the grooves.

I cut all the groves on the table saw spaced 25mm apart. I cut both sides in one piece to make sure that everything would line up. Top, bottom and back are also from the same material. I glued and nailed the carcass together. The shelves for the sandpaper were a little tricky because the kerf on my saw is 2.8mm and the self material is 3mm. I dealt with this by planing a low angle bevel on each side and sanding.

So thats all for 2016 and my sandpaper has a home for 2017.

 

A Small Welding Porject

This is the start of a laorgely non-woodworking project. I am building a chook house which will a welding project. I am recycling steel from a railing which once adorned the front of a house. The railing was over engineered and made form good quailty steel.

The first part has been joing some 2inch square tube to make uprights for the chook enclosure. I made a jig so that i could join the lengths  and keep then straight.

Gluing up

Gluing up #saw

Making some leather strops for carving chisels

#saw making some leather strops for carving chisels

Sawmill visit

Our woodturning group, Northern Turners,  was invited to a saw mill in the pleasant rural setting of Mount Torrens in South Australia. Members of other woodturning clubs,  who fall under the umbrella Woodgroup SA  were also there. We were there in part to see the operation of the sawmill and to buy some wood for turning. The mill is a small operation that is based on a dairy farm making the setting quite bucolic. On the day there were slabs and pieces of redgum available for sale and some camphor laurel.

Michael the sawmaster has two portable sawmills and had some elm setup to demonstrate both pieces of equipment.  the first on the he demonstrated was a Bushmill – portable saw mill which was made in Victoria for about 15 years. The company is no longer in existence. The machine is essentially a large bandsaw on its side  and is pushed along by the operator. The saw is powered by a petrol engine.

The other sawmill is a Lucas mill which sports a large chainsaw blade almost 5 feet across (I guess 1500 mm in the new money) . The saw was set up on a large concrete pad but can be moved onsite if required. Like the other sawmill it is controlled by the operator although it is not as rigid as the Bushmill unit so more attention needs to be paid to tracking the cutting saw square to the log being milled. Michael did mention that he does take the Lucas mill on site as well.
The Sawmills
The Bushmill saw has an advantage of a fixed base allowing that allows the log being milled to be clamped down.  This means that the log can be milled quite a way down as […]

Table saw stand gets wheels

Table saw stand gets wheels #saw

A grinding bench in Sketchup

I keep fiddling about with designing things in Sketchup. Its a steep learning curve to start with particularly as I tend to conceive and design in my head. The attached images are from a grinding that I made for my shed. I have limited space so I try where possible to make things mobile. The idea for this was to keep my bench grinder, wet sharpener and slow speed grinder all in the one place. I set about designing this all in Sketchup. The final design did of course alter as I built it. The main difference is the middle shelf isn’t full width. I made a space to accommodate a thickness planer that I own.

The Sketchup model  did help me visualise the project and helped with material sizes. I’m currently working on a base for my new table saw which I hoping will be more detailed.

 

Plane holder in progress

Plane holder in progress #bbb #saw