Blog interrupted by Spoonfest and Taljfest — Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notes

I have shamelessly reposted this form Peter Follansbee’s blog. I didn’t even realise that there was such a thing as an international wooden spooncarving festival in UK and Sweden on week apart. Would have been great to see but alas Australia is too far away.
Just when I pick things up, I gotta put ’em down. I’m off in a little while to England for Spoonfest http://spoonfest.co.uk/ – my first time at this now-renowned event. Can’t wait. After that, I’m going over to Sweden for Taljfest – http://www.saterglantan.com/evenemang/taljfest/ and then touring around Sweden a bit with Jogge Sundqvist. So there […]
via Blog interrupted by Spoonfest and Taljfest — Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notes

Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830 — Pegs and ‘Tails

For my North American reader: Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830 – an exhibition, August 19, 2016–January 8, 2017. Mahogany ‘desk and bookcase’ by Christopher Townsend, circa 1745–50. (Yale University) This groundbreaking exhibition presents a comprehensive survey of Rhode Island furniture from the colonial and early Federal periods, including elaborately carved chairs, […]
via Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830 — Pegs and ‘Tails

Gluing up

Gluing up #saw

Making some leather strops for carving chisels

#saw making some leather strops for carving chisels

Sawmill visit

Our woodturning group, Northern Turners,  was invited to a saw mill in the pleasant rural setting of Mount Torrens in South Australia. Members of other woodturning clubs,  who fall under the umbrella Woodgroup SA  were also there. We were there in part to see the operation of the sawmill and to buy some wood for turning. The mill is a small operation that is based on a dairy farm making the setting quite bucolic. On the day there were slabs and pieces of redgum available for sale and some camphor laurel.

Michael the sawmaster has two portable sawmills and had some elm setup to demonstrate both pieces of equipment.  the first on the he demonstrated was a Bushmill – portable saw mill which was made in Victoria for about 15 years. The company is no longer in existence. The machine is essentially a large bandsaw on its side  and is pushed along by the operator. The saw is powered by a petrol engine.

The other sawmill is a Lucas mill which sports a large chainsaw blade almost 5 feet across (I guess 1500 mm in the new money) . The saw was set up on a large concrete pad but can be moved onsite if required. Like the other sawmill it is controlled by the operator although it is not as rigid as the Bushmill unit so more attention needs to be paid to tracking the cutting saw square to the log being milled. Michael did mention that he does take the Lucas mill on site as well.
The Sawmills
The Bushmill saw has an advantage of a fixed base allowing that allows the log being milled to be clamped down.  This means that the log can be milled quite a way down as […]

Redgum for woodturning

Red gum for woodturning #saw

What’s this Stropping Magic? — Lost Art Press

If you’ve read even a little bit of the sharpening information in “The Woodworker: The Charles H. Hayward Years,” you’ve probably noticed how much they discuss stropping. We’ve had several questions from readers about this. Why do some people strop and some people don’t? Should we all be stropping? Is stropping outdated? Is it fayrie […]
via What’s this Stropping Magic? — Lost Art Press

Table saw stand gets wheels

Table saw stand gets wheels #saw

A grinding bench in Sketchup

I keep fiddling about with designing things in Sketchup. Its a steep learning curve to start with particularly as I tend to conceive and design in my head. The attached images are from a grinding that I made for my shed. I have limited space so I try where possible to make things mobile. The idea for this was to keep my bench grinder, wet sharpener and slow speed grinder all in the one place. I set about designing this all in Sketchup. The final design did of course alter as I built it. The main difference is the middle shelf isn’t full width. I made a space to accommodate a thickness planer that I own.

The Sketchup model  did help me visualise the project and helped with material sizes. I’m currently working on a base for my new table saw which I hoping will be more detailed.

 

Some Lizard Wood Carving

Some wood carving #bbb #saw