Gluing up

Gluing up #saw

Making some leather strops for carving chisels

#saw making some leather strops for carving chisels

Sawmill visit

Our woodturning group, Northern Turners,  was invited to a saw mill in the pleasant rural setting of Mount Torrens in South Australia. Members of other woodturning clubs,  who fall under the umbrella Woodgroup SA  were also there. We were there in part to see the operation of the sawmill and to buy some wood for turning. The mill is a small operation that is based on a dairy farm making the setting quite bucolic. On the day there were slabs and pieces of redgum available for sale and some camphor laurel.

Michael the sawmaster has two portable sawmills and had some elm setup to demonstrate both pieces of equipment.  the first on the he demonstrated was a Bushmill – portable saw mill which was made in Victoria for about 15 years. The company is no longer in existence. The machine is essentially a large bandsaw on its side  and is pushed along by the operator. The saw is powered by a petrol engine.

The other sawmill is a Lucas mill which sports a large chainsaw blade almost 5 feet across (I guess 1500 mm in the new money) . The saw was set up on a large concrete pad but can be moved onsite if required. Like the other sawmill it is controlled by the operator although it is not as rigid as the Bushmill unit so more attention needs to be paid to tracking the cutting saw square to the log being milled. Michael did mention that he does take the Lucas mill on site as well.
The Sawmills
The Bushmill saw has an advantage of a fixed base allowing that allows the log being milled to be clamped down.  This means that the log can be milled quite a way down as […]

Redgum for woodturning

Red gum for woodturning #saw

What’s this Stropping Magic? — Lost Art Press

If you’ve read even a little bit of the sharpening information in “The Woodworker: The Charles H. Hayward Years,” you’ve probably noticed how much they discuss stropping. We’ve had several questions from readers about this. Why do some people strop and some people don’t? Should we all be stropping? Is stropping outdated? Is it fayrie […]
via What’s this Stropping Magic? — Lost Art Press

Table saw stand gets wheels

Table saw stand gets wheels #saw

A grinding bench in Sketchup

I keep fiddling about with designing things in Sketchup. Its a steep learning curve to start with particularly as I tend to conceive and design in my head. The attached images are from a grinding that I made for my shed. I have limited space so I try where possible to make things mobile. The idea for this was to keep my bench grinder, wet sharpener and slow speed grinder all in the one place. I set about designing this all in Sketchup. The final design did of course alter as I built it. The main difference is the middle shelf isn’t full width. I made a space to accommodate a thickness planer that I own.

The Sketchup model  did help me visualise the project and helped with material sizes. I’m currently working on a base for my new table saw which I hoping will be more detailed.

 

Some Lizard Wood Carving

Some wood carving #bbb #saw

Plane holder in progress

Plane holder in progress #bbb #saw

Bosch GTS10XC

I have this year retired my trust Triton series 2000 workcentre. It has served me well but is getting old is very noisy and has limitations. I have been looking for nearly a year. I don’t have space for a cabinet saw as much as I would like one.

I started looking as the compact table saws. There were three contenders Bosch, Metabo and Dewalt. I did briefly look at a Makita but didn’t like the finish.  All three were comparable in price. I was to some extent aided by an article in Wood Review  an Australian woodworking magazine. There were pros and cons. The Dewalt had a rack and pinion fence system but I didn’t like the finish of the machine  overall.

I thought long and hard about the Metabo one of its strong point was an integral stand. Simply fold up and roll away.

In the end I opted for Bosch GTS10XC. I liked the braking when it shuts down. A mobile base would have been good but it came with a foldable base. The dust extraction works well and I can hook up my shop vac no problems.

I can rip up to 650mm wide. It also has a sliding table which holds the mitre gauge. Its simple to use and accurate. It has cut square out of the box.

I intend to build  a mobile base for Bosch GTS10XC table saw with storage draws. This will allow me to move it about and roll it away when not in use. I will also try and create a cross cut sled for this machine.

So its vale Triton Series 2000 workcentre and welcome to the Bosch GTS10XC.