A grinding bench in Sketchup

I keep fiddling about with designing things in Sketchup. Its a steep learning curve to start with particularly as I tend to conceive and design in my head. The attached images are from a grinding that I made for my shed. I have limited space so I try where possible to make things mobile. The idea for this was to keep my bench grinder, wet sharpener and slow speed grinder all in the one place. I set about designing this all in Sketchup. The final design did of course alter as I built it. The main difference is the middle shelf isn’t full width. I made a space to accommodate a thickness planer that I own.

The Sketchup model  did help me visualise the project and helped with material sizes. I’m currently working on a base for my new table saw which I hoping will be more detailed.

 

Still More Hanging Planes #saw

Still more hanging planes #saw

Hanging Planes Number 2 #saw

Hanging planes #saw

Some Lizard Wood Carving

Some wood carving #bbb #saw

Plane holder in progress

Plane holder in progress #bbb #saw

Bosch GTS10XC

I have this year retired my trust Triton series 2000 workcentre. It has served me well but is getting old is very noisy and has limitations. I have been looking for nearly a year. I don’t have space for a cabinet saw as much as I would like one.

I started looking as the compact table saws. There were three contenders Bosch, Metabo and Dewalt. I did briefly look at a Makita but didn’t like the finish.  All three were comparable in price. I was to some extent aided by an article in Wood Review  an Australian woodworking magazine. There were pros and cons. The Dewalt had a rack and pinion fence system but I didn’t like the finish of the machine  overall.

I thought long and hard about the Metabo one of its strong point was an integral stand. Simply fold up and roll away.

In the end I opted for Bosch GTS10XC. I liked the braking when it shuts down. A mobile base would have been good but it came with a foldable base. The dust extraction works well and I can hook up my shop vac no problems.

I can rip up to 650mm wide. It also has a sliding table which holds the mitre gauge. Its simple to use and accurate. It has cut square out of the box.

I intend to build  a mobile base for Bosch GTS10XC table saw with storage draws. This will allow me to move it about and roll it away when not in use. I will also try and create a cross cut sled for this machine.

So its vale Triton Series 2000 workcentre and welcome to the Bosch GTS10XC.

Baby Chair Repair – Part 3

This is the final part of the baby chair repair. Part 1 focussed on dismantling and stripping the paint off the baby chair. Part 2  was concerned with repairing the dismantled parts. This last part is about sanding finishing and assembly.
Sanding is a boring but necessary part of any project. Many YouTube woodworking videos skip over sanding in fear of boring their audience. The baby chair had lots of sanding. I completed the finishing process using cabinet scrapers which always yields great results.
I brushed on a water based varnish allowing a day between coats. A light sand between coats knocked the bumps off. I waited for a week to before final assembly so that the finish would harden. I recall reading about this in a Woodsmith magazine a long time ago.
The metal parts including the wheels were also caked with years of paint. Paint stripper and a wire brush cleaned up these parts. I finished the metal parts with a two part rust inhibiting paint. A black satin finish sets the metal work off nicely.
As with the previous parts there is a compilation courtesy of Animoto.

Baby Chair Repair – Part 2

Following on from part one of this series some of the cleaned up parts required repairing. The baby chairs is constructed from what I think is Tasmanian oak. There wasn’t much damage one tenon had broken off a rail. The other parts that are have worn are near the cast iron wheels.

I was able to turn a custom dowel to replace the missing tenon. I had thought the tenon was integral to the stretcher so it required drilling to get the bits and pieces out. I even used carving chisels to clean up the stretcher. In the end the repair was successful.

The pieces close to the cast iron wheels had splinters missing making the area for the axle holes  weakened. I uses a straight cutting router bit and a router table. I was able to carefully remove the damaged parts. I had some old pieces of Tasmanian Oak on hand that allowed me to make small pieces to replace the damaged parts. The new wood was a good match for the original timber on the baby chair.

The other major damage to the baby chair was the tray. The original was a piece of plywood which had become delaminated overtime. I did entertain gluing the original plywood back together. In the end I  made  a new tray from some old plywood I had kept from dismantling old furniture.

As with the previous part of this baby chair repair I have a compilation from Animoto.

 

Baby Chair Repair – Part 1

We inherited this baby chair when our children were small. It has been sitting around the shed for many years being moved everytime we had a cleanup.Like many older pieces of wooden furniture it has been renovated many times. The baby chair was covered in several layers of paint besides the original varnish finish.

I don’t know much about its provenance other than it being in one family for  a long time. I did find a manufacturer’s label on it from T.H.Brown and Sons. A quick search on Google revealed that  T.H. Brownand sons were a well know Adelaide (South Australia) furniture maker founded in about 1910. They were important enough to be included in the SA Design Museum. Their products were available Australia wide through department stores.I think the baby chair dates from the 1940s or 50s.

I haven’t made a video of the process however I took a series of photographs and assembled them in Animoto. This is part one of the process stripping the paint pulling it apart and stripping the years of paint of the frame.

 

Hand Drill Restoration

In e recent post I mentioned that I received a hand drill as a gift. There are no identifying marks on the drill so I don’t know where it comes from or how old it is. Most likely it is an Australian hand drill although there are a lot of English tools in Australia. What I really enjoyed was taking it apart. Every piece was screwed together which meant that I could completely disassemble it. This is unusual now as most products are made in a way that makes disassembly difficult. A nice feature of the drill is a compartment inside the handle. This would be great to small drill bits.

After a thorough clean and oil I put it all back together. The only real damage was the crank handle which had become bent over time. This was easily fixed at the vice. I decided not to paint the drill. The action of the crank and crown wheel is really smooth.

The chuck tightens very  nicely and can hold drill smaller than my modern cordless drill. This is useful for drilling small pilot holes. Particularly in the case of small brass screws which break easily without a pilot hole

I was too impatient to make a video so I put together this collage on Animoto. The following looks pretty good and gives a great look at all the parts that make up this hand drill.