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The Historic Evidence for Tool Selection and Use — Lost Art Press

This is an excerpt from “Make a Joint Stool from a Tree” by Jennie Alexander and Peter Follansbee. There are several sources we use to learn about a 17th-century joiner’s tool kit. The surviving furniture retains many tool marks left by the joiners. These marks can include those from riving and hewing, layout marks for stock dimensioning and joinery, and even […] via The Historic Evidence for Tool Selection and Use — Lost Art Press

By |October 7th, 2018|Categories: News|0 Comments

Parquetry flooring

  What fun patching parquetry flooring. I took a small feature wall out ,not my idea but it's gone. This left a gap in the parquetry flooring. I was lucky in being able to find an exact replacement. The parquetry is Tasmanian Blue gum. I thought that pulling up a strip leaving a straight edged gap was all I needed to do. Turns out each row of three blocks has to be fitted individually. 21 rows in total. What a pain luckily I have a substantial Disk sander to speed up the process. Still takes time as each strip needs to be measured and sanded to size. Following this lots of trips to the sander to sneak up on the required size. The cat likes to help.    

By |August 31st, 2018|Categories: Renovating|Tags: |0 Comments

Wood for Turning

Spent the afternoon annoying the neighbours with the sound of my chainsaw.  Five wheelbarrows of wood that I will be using for woodturning.  Two species  were salvaged. Lots  of apple wood that came from a friend's renovation project. The apple tree made way for a timber deck. Lucky me! The olive wood was quite dirty as it included the root stump. I had to pressure clean that part in the vain hope that it would keep my chainsaw in good shape for a while longer.  The other wood came from an olive farm. The farmer is downsizing his farm from 700 trees to 500. He generously offered the trees with stumps attached to our turning club. He even had a tractor on standby to help load my trailer. I intend to carve some spoons with the apple wood. I actually harvested the wood in November 2017 and this post got lost in my draft folder. I have already carved several spoons form the apple wood. I hope some bowls will emerge from the olive stumps.    Olive StumpsApple and Olive Apple Wood

More Images with Gutenberg

Just trying the gallery tool seems to work without too much hassle. The Gutenberg thing is a bit of a paradigm shift. I think I am getting my head around it. This is an attempt to use the gallery block. Easy enough but I can't see any obvious way to fiddle with the gallery lay out . 

By |August 3rd, 2018|Categories: Furniture, News|0 Comments

Testing the New Gutenberg Editor

This is my first attempt at using the new Gutenberg editor. Looks very different and in the true style of a man I didn't bother with the instructions. I have discovered the blocks and this one is a paragraph block. The next thing  may be a picture block. I found the colour changer on the side bar seems to have popped up when I wasn't looking Ill be interested to see how  easy inserting pictures will be. This has always been my least favourite part of WordPress. The picture below was taken on my Samsung S5  and is part of a chair that I am currently repairing. The picture was downloaded from Google Pics and inserted with drag and drop.  chair repair

By |August 3rd, 2018|Categories: News|0 Comments

Nancy Hiller’s ‘English Arts & Crafts Furniture’ Book — Lost Art Press

Speaking as someone who has read too many woodworking books, there are a few archetypes: the project book (“Birdhouse Bonanza”), the tool book (“Router Rodeo!”) and the black-turtleneck-and-beret books on why me make things (“My Mortise is Deeper than My Soul”). Nancy Hiller’s new book “English Arts & Crafts Furniture” is none of these books. […] via Nancy Hiller’s ‘English Arts & Crafts Furniture’ Book — Lost Art Press

By |June 29th, 2018|Categories: News|0 Comments

A Family Restoration – Kitchen Table

This is a family restoration the piece in question belonged to my wife's grandmother. I twas most likely a dressing table or a washstand. There is evidence on the top that something was screwed to it in the past. Grandma used it as a kitchen table (which is what I will refer to it as) and bench which means the top took a beating.  Other than that the piece was in reasonably good condition. There were no manufacturer's marks which makes dating the piece difficult. Im no expert but it looks Edwardian to me  so it must be over 100 years old. Kitchen table The kitchen table was finished with shellac so I washed it with methylated spirits and steel wool. The top was the most damaged and I used a cabinet scraper to remove most os the finish. This exposed the old screw holes so I ended up sandins the whole top. Sanding removed some water damage but left the timber looking brand new. I didn't touch the edges other than a light sand. I needed to fill some old screw holes and decided to use wooden plugs. The timber was difficult to identify. In the end I used some red pine as the  grain and colour were close to the original. After more sanding I stained the top with a mahogany stain to bring it closer to the rest of the kitchen table. I applied several coats of shellac to the top and then followed up with three coats to the entire piece. I sanded lightly between coats leaving the final coat. After a week or so I applied beeswax which brought a nice finish. The only other challenge were two of [...]

A Chair for Our Grand Daughter

An old school chair probably form an infant school. I think infant schools are now called junior primary schools. Our Grand Daughter can't even walk yet so I got in early and renovated the chair. Not much to it really a bit of sanding some spray paint and some off cuts of plywood. I shaped the seat with a slight taper front to back and a similar idea on the back rest. Because we are so safety conscious and that hardware is cheaper i used dome nuts on the back. This way little fingers won't be able to fiddle the nuts off the bolts. I added some Loctite threadlocker just to make extra sure I replaced the the stoppers at the end of the legs as well. The new chair stoppers are rubberised so the chaori cannot be pushed about easily.